Sarah Booker

04/07/2014

Bravo to Oxford Mail tackling “right to be forgotten” ruling

I admire Oxford Mail editor Simon O’Neill’s stand against Google removing a story about a theft.

By writing about the move he keeps the story alive.

It is a prime example of the Streisand effect. You want it to go away but the noise gets louder.

During my eight years as a web editor with the Worthing Herald series and The Argus I lost count of the number of times people asked me to remove stories about convictions.

Invariably news stories came up on search engines causing problems for the individual.

Usually the person had kept quiet about the conviction and ended up losing a job, occasionally it caused problems with their family and friends.

This was always the newspapers’ fault for publishing, not theirs for committing a crime.

When the European Court of Justice ruled Google (PDF) should remove articles from search engines at user request I wondered what publishers would do to counteract it.

The message to people who want to hide their misdeeds is to be honest with the people you know.

Admit to your crime, however minor, and get on with what life throws at you.

Better still, keep within the law.

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29/11/2010

Creating something visually stimulating from data #hhhrbi

Filed under: journalism,technical — Sarah Booker Lewis @ 12:56 pm
Tags: , , , , ,

We were quite a large group to start with, so we’ve ended up splitting in two. One group is working on scraping details of registered care homes, and I’m in a group working on information gathered but creating an interesting and informative visual.

Our first battle was making sure Scraperwiki could read our data so we could work with it.

First of all I uploaded to Google docs, but the comma separated values (CSV) scraper didn’t like it. Then when the spreadsheet was published as a web page, as suggested by  it still wasn’t happy because it wanted to be signed into Google.

Matt suggested putting the CSV onto his server, so I exported it and sent it over to him.

Francis Irving also suggested scraping What Do They Know, because it was Freedom of Information dat.

After much fiddling Matt managed to pull out the raw data by popping (pulling from the top of the list) and using a Python scraper.

It turned out the data we had was so unstructured it wasn’t possible to work with it.

After lunch we’re working on a different project.

14/03/2010

Brighton Future of News election special #bfong

Brighton Future of News Group has an election theme for the second meeting on Monday, March 22.

Web developer Richard Pope will be talking about his work with Democracy Club, The Straight Choice and My Society.

I am an election geek living in a constituency where a three-horse race is developing between Nancy Platts (Labour), Caroline Lucas (Green) and Charlotte Vere (Conservative).

Sorry Bernadette Millam (Liberal Democrat) and Nigel Carter (UKIP), but it’s true.

All three have been campaigning. As a resident I’ve been aware of Nancy Platts beavering away in the background for a year or so now.  Charlotte Vere seems to have taken up a Saturday morning residency in London Road and Caroline Lucas has also been spotted.

One of the ideas suggested at the first Brighton Future of News Group was a candidate tracking Google map. Jo Wadsworth, web editor of the Brighton Argus had the Brighton Pavilion map up within a few days.

This is the sort of innovative idea that can come out of an event where journalists, bloggers and technical wizards can get together.

Personally, I’m very interested in The Straight Choice, and have started collecting up the few election leaflets my partner hasn’t thrown straight into the recycling.

Once this election is over it will be interesting to see the stories arising from the literature targeting our votes.

Join in the discussion at The Skiff at 7.30pm for a prompt start.

Your hosts are Judith Townend from Journalism.co.uk and me.

Brighton Future of News Group is open to all with an interest in news and journalism, from broadcasters to bloggers, PRs to podcasters, programmers, students, writers, journalists and all media folk.