Sarah Booker

19/11/2010

Great people for journalists to follow on Twitter #ff

Alan Rusbridger‘s article today, Why Twitter matters for media organisations listed a great many reasons for using Twitter.

During my years on Twitter I have found it is a great way to learn and I continue to learn a great deal by following other digital journalists, educators and developers.

In an effort to help journalists stepping into the Twittersphere for the first time I have compiled a list of really useful people to follow and learn from.

Teaching and learning

Paul Bradshaw – Lecturer and social media consultant Online journalism blog – great tips  Twitter.com/ojblog

BBC Journalism College

Clay Shirky – Influential future media blogger

Glynn Mottershead – Journalism lecturer

Andy Dickinson – Online journalism lecturer and links; twitter.com/linkydickinson

Jeff Jarvis – The Buzz Machine blogger and journalism professor

Sue Llewellyn – BBC social media trainer and TV journo

Steve Yelvington – Newsroom trainer

Jay Rosen – Journalism lecturer at NYU

Roy Greenslade – City University, media commentator

Journalists

Alison Gow – Executive Editor, digital, for the Liverpool Daily Post & Liverpool Echo

Marc Reeves – The Business Desk, West Midlands

Richard Kendall – Web editor Peterborough Evening Telegraph

David Higgerson – Head of Multimedia, Trinity Mirror

Sam Shepherd – Bournemouth Echo digital projects

Jo WadsworthBrighton Argus web editor

Matt Cornish – journalist and author of Monkeys and Typewriters

Louise Bolotin – Journalist and hyperlocal blogger

Sarah Booker (me because I try to be useful)

Joanna Geary – Guardian digital development editor twitter.com/joannageary and  twitter.com/joannaslinks

Adam Tinworth –  Consultant and ex-Reed Business Information editorial development manager

Adam Westbrook – Lecturer and multimedia journalist

Patrick Smith – The Media Briefing

Shane Richmond – Telegraph Head of technology

Edward Roussel – Telegraph digital editor

Damian Thompson – Telegraph blogs editor

Kate Day – Telegraph communities editor

Ilicco Elia – Former Head of mobile Reuters

Sarah Hartley– Guardian local

Jemima Kiss – Guardian media/tech reporter

Kate Bevan – Guardian media/tech reporter

Josh Halliday – Media Guardian

Jessica Reid – Guardian Comment is Free

Charles Arthur – Tech Guardian editor

Heather Brooke – Investigative journalist, FOI campaigner

Kevin Anderson – Journalist, ex BBC, ex Guardian

Wannabehacks – Journalism students and trainees

Simon Rogers – Guardian data journalist and editor of the datastore

Jon Slattery – Journalist

Laura Oliver – Journalism.co.uk

Johann Hari – Journalist, The Independent (personal)

Guy Clapperton – Journalist and writer

Alan Rusbridger – Guardian editor

Specialists

George Hopkin – Seo evangelist

Nieman Journalism Lab – Harvard

Martin Belam – Guardian internet advisor

Tony Hirst – OU lecturer and data mash up artist

Christian Payne – Photography, video, mobile media

David Allen Green – Lawyer and writer

Judith Townend – Meeja Law & From the Online

Richard Pope – Scraperwiki director

Suw Charman-Anderson – social software consultant and writer

Scraperwiki – Data scraping and information

Chris Taggart – Founder of Openly Local and They Work for You

Suzanne Kavanagh – Publishing sector manager at Skillset, personal account

Greg Hadfield – Director of strategic projects at Cogapp, ex Fleet Streets

Francis Irving – Scraperwiki

Ben Goldacre – Bad Science

Philip John – Journal Local, Litchfield Blog,  twitter.com/hyperaboutlocal

David McCandless – Information is Beautiful

Flying Binary – Cloud computing and visual analytics

Rick Waghorn – Journalist and founder of Addiply

News sources

Journalism news

Journalism blogs

Mike ButcherTech Crunch UK

Richard MacManus – Read Write Web

The Media Blog

Press Gazette

Hold the Front Page

Mashable – Social media blog

Media Guardian

Guardian tech weekly

Paid Content

The Media Brief

BBC news

Channel4 news

Channel4 newsroom blogger

Sky News

House of Twits –  Houses of Parliament

Telegraph Technology

14/03/2010

Brighton Future of News election special #bfong

Brighton Future of News Group has an election theme for the second meeting on Monday, March 22.

Web developer Richard Pope will be talking about his work with Democracy Club, The Straight Choice and My Society.

I am an election geek living in a constituency where a three-horse race is developing between Nancy Platts (Labour), Caroline Lucas (Green) and Charlotte Vere (Conservative).

Sorry Bernadette Millam (Liberal Democrat) and Nigel Carter (UKIP), but it’s true.

All three have been campaigning. As a resident I’ve been aware of Nancy Platts beavering away in the background for a year or so now.  Charlotte Vere seems to have taken up a Saturday morning residency in London Road and Caroline Lucas has also been spotted.

One of the ideas suggested at the first Brighton Future of News Group was a candidate tracking Google map. Jo Wadsworth, web editor of the Brighton Argus had the Brighton Pavilion map up within a few days.

This is the sort of innovative idea that can come out of an event where journalists, bloggers and technical wizards can get together.

Personally, I’m very interested in The Straight Choice, and have started collecting up the few election leaflets my partner hasn’t thrown straight into the recycling.

Once this election is over it will be interesting to see the stories arising from the literature targeting our votes.

Join in the discussion at The Skiff at 7.30pm for a prompt start.

Your hosts are Judith Townend from Journalism.co.uk and me.

Brighton Future of News Group is open to all with an interest in news and journalism, from broadcasters to bloggers, PRs to podcasters, programmers, students, writers, journalists and all media folk.

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