Sarah Booker

19/11/2010

Great people for journalists to follow on Twitter #ff

Alan Rusbridger‘s article today, Why Twitter matters for media organisations listed a great many reasons for using Twitter.

During my years on Twitter I have found it is a great way to learn and I continue to learn a great deal by following other digital journalists, educators and developers.

In an effort to help journalists stepping into the Twittersphere for the first time I have compiled a list of really useful people to follow and learn from.

Teaching and learning

Paul Bradshaw – Lecturer and social media consultant Online journalism blog – great tips  Twitter.com/ojblog

BBC Journalism College

Clay Shirky – Influential future media blogger

Glynn Mottershead – Journalism lecturer

Andy Dickinson – Online journalism lecturer and links; twitter.com/linkydickinson

Jeff Jarvis – The Buzz Machine blogger and journalism professor

Sue Llewellyn – BBC social media trainer and TV journo

Steve Yelvington – Newsroom trainer

Jay Rosen – Journalism lecturer at NYU

Roy Greenslade – City University, media commentator

Journalists

Alison Gow – Executive Editor, digital, for the Liverpool Daily Post & Liverpool Echo

Marc Reeves – The Business Desk, West Midlands

Richard Kendall – Web editor Peterborough Evening Telegraph

David Higgerson – Head of Multimedia, Trinity Mirror

Sam Shepherd – Bournemouth Echo digital projects

Jo WadsworthBrighton Argus web editor

Matt Cornish – journalist and author of Monkeys and Typewriters

Louise Bolotin – Journalist and hyperlocal blogger

Sarah Booker (me because I try to be useful)

Joanna Geary – Guardian digital development editor twitter.com/joannageary and  twitter.com/joannaslinks

Adam Tinworth –  Consultant and ex-Reed Business Information editorial development manager

Adam Westbrook – Lecturer and multimedia journalist

Patrick Smith – The Media Briefing

Shane Richmond – Telegraph Head of technology

Edward Roussel – Telegraph digital editor

Damian Thompson – Telegraph blogs editor

Kate Day – Telegraph communities editor

Ilicco Elia – Former Head of mobile Reuters

Sarah Hartley– Guardian local

Jemima Kiss – Guardian media/tech reporter

Kate Bevan – Guardian media/tech reporter

Josh Halliday – Media Guardian

Jessica Reid – Guardian Comment is Free

Charles Arthur – Tech Guardian editor

Heather Brooke – Investigative journalist, FOI campaigner

Kevin Anderson – Journalist, ex BBC, ex Guardian

Wannabehacks – Journalism students and trainees

Simon Rogers – Guardian data journalist and editor of the datastore

Jon Slattery – Journalist

Laura Oliver – Journalism.co.uk

Johann Hari – Journalist, The Independent (personal)

Guy Clapperton – Journalist and writer

Alan Rusbridger – Guardian editor

Specialists

George Hopkin – Seo evangelist

Nieman Journalism Lab – Harvard

Martin Belam – Guardian internet advisor

Tony Hirst – OU lecturer and data mash up artist

Christian Payne – Photography, video, mobile media

David Allen Green – Lawyer and writer

Judith Townend – Meeja Law & From the Online

Richard Pope – Scraperwiki director

Suw Charman-Anderson – social software consultant and writer

Scraperwiki – Data scraping and information

Chris Taggart – Founder of Openly Local and They Work for You

Suzanne Kavanagh – Publishing sector manager at Skillset, personal account

Greg Hadfield – Director of strategic projects at Cogapp, ex Fleet Streets

Francis Irving – Scraperwiki

Ben Goldacre – Bad Science

Philip John – Journal Local, Litchfield Blog,  twitter.com/hyperaboutlocal

David McCandless – Information is Beautiful

Flying Binary – Cloud computing and visual analytics

Rick Waghorn – Journalist and founder of Addiply

News sources

Journalism news

Journalism blogs

Mike ButcherTech Crunch UK

Richard MacManus – Read Write Web

The Media Blog

Press Gazette

Hold the Front Page

Mashable – Social media blog

Media Guardian

Guardian tech weekly

Paid Content

The Media Brief

BBC news

Channel4 news

Channel4 newsroom blogger

Sky News

House of Twits –  Houses of Parliament

Telegraph Technology

14/03/2010

Brighton Future of News election special #bfong

Brighton Future of News Group has an election theme for the second meeting on Monday, March 22.

Web developer Richard Pope will be talking about his work with Democracy Club, The Straight Choice and My Society.

I am an election geek living in a constituency where a three-horse race is developing between Nancy Platts (Labour), Caroline Lucas (Green) and Charlotte Vere (Conservative).

Sorry Bernadette Millam (Liberal Democrat) and Nigel Carter (UKIP), but it’s true.

All three have been campaigning. As a resident I’ve been aware of Nancy Platts beavering away in the background for a year or so now.  Charlotte Vere seems to have taken up a Saturday morning residency in London Road and Caroline Lucas has also been spotted.

One of the ideas suggested at the first Brighton Future of News Group was a candidate tracking Google map. Jo Wadsworth, web editor of the Brighton Argus had the Brighton Pavilion map up within a few days.

This is the sort of innovative idea that can come out of an event where journalists, bloggers and technical wizards can get together.

Personally, I’m very interested in The Straight Choice, and have started collecting up the few election leaflets my partner hasn’t thrown straight into the recycling.

Once this election is over it will be interesting to see the stories arising from the literature targeting our votes.

Join in the discussion at The Skiff at 7.30pm for a prompt start.

Your hosts are Judith Townend from Journalism.co.uk and me.

Brighton Future of News Group is open to all with an interest in news and journalism, from broadcasters to bloggers, PRs to podcasters, programmers, students, writers, journalists and all media folk.

09/02/2010

Brighton Future of News Group first meeting #bfong

The first Brighton Future of News Group took place yesterday (Monday, February 8), attracting a variety of journalists, writers, bloggers and techy folk, all interested in telling stories and relaying facts in new and interesting ways.

Jo Wadsworth

Our first speaker was Jo Wadsworth, web editor at the Brighton Argus, who spoke about building a community of bloggers writing on specific themes or hyperlocally, the sort of news that might not make it into the newspaper, but will be of wider interest.

Examples included the Bevendean Bulletin, which uses the Argus in lieu of its own website. Student reporters from the Journalist Works gaining experience by writing patch blogs, and others are aspiring writers dipping their toes in the water.

Jo was keen to point out the bloggers aren’t considered a replacement for reporters, but rather augmenting the newspaper’s website.

After all, as Jo explained, these people will be blogging anyway why not utilise their enthusiasm and talent for the paper?

The bloggers benefit from a ready-made audience and technical support, the paper gets street-level coverage.

Jo cited the pothole paradox hypothesized by Steven Berlin Johnston ie. extremely local, small-scale news is interesting to people living in a certain street with pot holes but not to those living a few streets away.

When it comes to looking after a paper’s bloggers, Jo advised giving constructive but honest feedback and never be afraid to turn people down.

I was pretty pleased to hear there was a high turnover of bloggers and some who didn’t even start, as I’ve had similar situations with a number of ex and failed-to-starters.

Simon Willison

The second speaker Simon Willison initially talked about his work creating the  software and database for The Guardian’s MPs’ expenses crowd-sourcing project, where more than 200,000 documents were studied in the search for interesting information.

The structure was put together in a week before 450,000 documents were dumped into the public domain during this act of government “transparency”.

It was a steep learning curve for the team behind the project, but it was developed on for the second release of MPs’ expenses information for 2008/9 and the first quarter of 2009/10.

A few thousand documents were torn through by the crowd. Simon and the team created a wider variety of tags for each page, such as food or soft furnishings.

Hand-written pages were often particularly interesting, such as a lengthy note from Jack Straw.

My personal favourite site Simon has created is Wildlifenearyou.com where people can share their pictures of wildlife, both wild and captive. It’s an amazing site where people can vote for their favourite pictures of animals, add their own, find creatures geographically. It really is imaginative.

A spin off site is Owlsnearyou.com which has had friends/fans hijacking the American Superbowl hashtag #superbowlday superb-owl-day, geddit…

Simon also showed impressive crowd-sourced maps, particularly a post-earthquake map of Haiti, created by users of OpenStreetmap.org

It was pretty impressive to see what could be created by people with the imagination and skills to make something happen and not just draw ideas out on paper.

Break away

Both talks definitely fired the imaginations of everyone involved who took part in the break-away sessions at the end of the evening.

The four groups came up with multimedia ways to cover Brighton Pride, this year’s general election and transport issues.

A particular favourite of mine was creating a spot the candidate Google map. Now that’s an idea with legs.

Other blogs/posts about Brighton Future of News Group:

A document of all the event’s tweets featuring the hashtag #bfong.

Laura Oliver, editor of Journalism.co.uk also blogged about Jo Wadsworth’s and Simon Willison’s presentations, as did John Keenan.

Judith Townend, from Journalism.co.uk organised the event at The Skiff and put together a summary linked with the first Future of News Group West Midlands meeting, which took place on the same evening.

The original UK Future of News Group was set up by Adam Westbrook.

24/01/2010

The Future of News in Brighton

Journalists and new media folk in Brighton and Sussex are invited to join the UK Future of News Group Brighton nest.

It’s an opportunity to discuss new ideas within the news industry with like-minded people.

The first meeting on Monday, February 8, is at The Skiff in Brighton from 7.15pm.

Speakers are:

Simon Willison the man behind Wildlifenearyou.com and the Guardian’s MPs’ expenses crowdsourcing project and many other projects.

Jo Wadsworth web editor at Brighton’s Argus newspaper. Jo will be talking about building an online community and blogging.

The original UK Future of News Group set up by Adam Westbrook has held two meetings in London, with interesting speakers and great networking opportunities.

I couldn’t make it to January’s meet and felt extremely jealous reading the #fong and #futureofnews tweets.

After joining the London group I started a thread on the message board asking if any Brighton-based media folk would be interested in setting up a ‘nest’.

Withing 24 hours of my post Judith Townend of Journalism.co.uk was ready to run with the idea.

My contribution? Well, I’ve invited many  Johnston Press journalists from across Sussex.

Fingers crossed this will be a great regular event.

18/11/2009

Useful people to follow on Twitter – Part one

This week I am hosting my first online journalism lecture/workshop/seminar for NCTJ news and magazine journalism students at Brighton City College.

During the session I’ll be looking at Twitter as an information source. I have found stories for the newspapers I work for, and discovered a host of useful information to help me with my work.
Here is the first batch of journalism and social media folk I  would recommend for a #followfriday dedicated to journalists new to Twitter, but without the 140 limit.

George Hopkin – Johnston Press seo evangelist.

Mashable – Social media blog . The latest tricks, toys and gossip in the world of social media and a few handy guides, too.

Paul Bradshaw – Lecturer and social media consultant.

Online Journalism Blog – great tips from Paul Bradshaw and co

Joanna Geary – Times web development editor.  Also follow her professional account and her bookmarks @timesjoanna and @joannaslinks

Alison Gow – Executive Editor, digital, for the Liverpool Daily Post & Liverpool Echo.

Jo Wadsworth – Brighton Argus web editor @brightonargusjo

Glenn Mottershead – Journalism lecturer.

Andy Dickinson – Online journalism lecturer. See his bookmarks @linkydickinson

Sarah Hartley – Guardian local launch editor.

Clay Shirky – Influential future media blogger.

Journalism news Tips, news and a whole host of useful information.

Judith Townend – From Journalism News.

Media Guardian – Updated throughout the week. More than Monday’s weekly supplement.

Shane Richmond – Telegraph Head of technology.

Kate Day – Telegraph communities editor.

Martin Belam – Guardian internet advisor: Currybet.

Charles Arthur – Tech Guardian editor.

Ilicco Elia –  Head of mobile Reuters.

Channel4 newsroom blogger – follow the newsroom process before the bulletin.

Krishnan Guru-Murthy – Channel4 news.

Jemima Kiss – Guardian media/tech journalist and UK Twitter queen.

Patrick Smith – PaidContent UK .

Damian Thompson – Telegraph blogs editor.

Jeff Jarvis – The Buzz Machine blogger and journalism professor.
David Higgerson – Head of Multimedia, Trinity Mirror; Exec Editor, Bham Post and Mail.

Louise Bolotin – Journalist and blogger.

Richard Kendall – Web editor Peterborough Evening Telegraph.

Documentally – Mobile media maker.

Tech Crunch UK – Tech news and information.

Mike Butcher – Tech Crunch UK.

Neiman Journalism Lab – Harvard.

Richard MacManus – Read Write Web.

Daren Forsyth – Ex-BBC, now 140characters.co.uk

Josh Halliday – Journalism student and social media user.

Matt Cornish – Newspaper editor.

And to end part one, why not add me, too – Sarah Booker.

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